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A risk factor is something that increases your chances of getting a disease or condition.

Sexually transmitted chlamydial infections are transferred from one person to another by direct contact with an infected partner. Chlamydia is highly contagious and one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

Factors that increase your risk of getting chlamydia include:

  • Being sexually active and 15-25 years old
  • Having multiple sex partners
  • Having sex without a condom
  • A history of STDs

Neonatal chlamydia is transmitted during childbirth from an infected mother to her baby. It is a common cause of newborn conjunctivitis and chlamydial pneumonia. Most hospitals in the US are required to give eye drops to newborns to prevent conjunctivitis.

References

Chlamydia. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/std/chlamydia/default.htm. Updated April 30, 2013. Accessed May 16, 2013.

Chlamydia genital infection. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us. Updated March 13, 2013. Accessed May 16, 2013.

Chlamydia fact sheet. US Department of Health and Human Services Women's Health website. Available at: http://www.womenshealth.gov/. Updated July 8, 2011. Accessed May 16, 2013.

Ornithosis. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us. Updated November 30, 2009. Accessed May 16, 2013.

Trachoma. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us. Updated June 21, 2012. Accessed May 16, 2013.

Workowski KA, Berman S, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines, 2010. MMWR. 2010;59(No. RR-12):1-110.

Last reviewed May 2013 by Brian Randall, MD

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.