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You have a unique medical history. Therefore, it is essential to talk with your doctor about your personal risk factors and/or experience with asthma. By talking openly and regularly with your doctor, you can take an active role in your care.

General Tips for Gathering Information

Here are some tips that will make it easier for you to talk to your doctor:

  • Bring someone else with you. It helps to have another person hear what is said and think of questions to ask.
  • Write out your questions ahead of time, so you don't forget them.
  • Write down the answers you get, and make sure you understand what you are hearing. Ask for clarification, if necessary.
  • Don't be afraid to ask your questions or ask where you can find more information about what you are discussing. You have a right to know.
  • Consider keeping a diary of your symptoms, asthma triggers, and a schedule of your medications. Share this with your doctor during every visit.
Specific Questions to Ask Your Doctor
About Your Risk of Developing Asthma
  • Based on my medical history, lifestyle, and family background, am I at risk for asthma?
  • How can I decrease my risk of asthma or asthma attacks?
About Treatment Options
  • What is the best treatment for me?
  • What should I do if I am having an asthma attack?
  • What medications are best suited for my asthma condition?
    • What are the benefits/side effects of these medications?
    • Will these medications interact with other medications, over-the-counter products, dietary, or herbal supplements I am already taking for other conditions?
  • Are there any alternative or complementary therapies that will help me?
About Lifestyle Changes
  • Is it safe to exercise?
  • Are there certain exercises that are safer than others?
  • Are there any foods that I should avoid?
  • Should I avoid alcohol?
  • I'm a smoker. Where can I find help for quitting?
  • Do I need to avoid pregnancy because of my medications?
  • If I become pregnant, should I stop or restrict intake of asthma medication and are there ways I can reduced my child's risk of asthma?
  • Is there something in my home and/or work environment that may cause asthma? If so, what can I do about it?
  • How can I modify my environment to reduce asthma attacks?
About Outlook
  • How will asthma affect my activities?
  • Will I continue to have asthma for the next several years?
  • Will I have asthma all my life?
  • Will the severity of the asthma change?
  • Will asthma shorten my life expectancy?
  • Will my children have asthma?
References:

American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology website. Available at: http://www.acaai.org/. Accessed July, 2008.

American Lung Association website. Available at: http://www.lung.org/. Accessed July, 2008.

12/12/2012 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us. Wood LG, Garg ML, Smart JM, et al. Manipulating Antioxidant Intake in Asthma: A Randomized Control Trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):534-543.

Last reviewed September 2013 by Michael Woods, MD

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.