Director of Psychology and Training:
James C. DeGiovanni, Ph.D.
Phone: (860) 545-7167
Fax: (860) 545-7202
For information pertaining to APA accreditation, please contact:
American Psychological Association
Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation
750 First Street, NE
Washington, DC  20002-4242
(T) 202-336-5979  (F) 202-336-5978
Email: apaaccred@apa.org
Web: www.apa.org/ed/accreditation
Click here for more information regarding the Psychology Department

The Psychology Department offers predoctoral training in adult and child/adolescent clinical psychology.

 

 
I.  Introduction

The Psychology Department offers predoctoral training in adult and child/adolescent clinical psychology. The internship has three tracks to which applicants can apply; (1) Child/adolescent track; (2) Adult track; and starting in the 2013-2014 training year, a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy track. In addition, postdoctoral training is offered in General Clinical Psychology with the following areas of focus: anxiety disorders, child/adolescent clinical psychology, general adult inpatient psychiatry, pediatric consultation/liaison and psychoses and cognitive rehabilitation of schizophrenia; Clinical Neuropsychology; and Health Psychology. Advanced training opportunities in behavioral medicine, psychological testing, and pediatric psychology, are also available.

The goal of all of these programs is to provide trainees a diverse, well-supervised, and in-depth training experience that prepares them to assume full responsibility for patient care, and to function as independent practitioners of clinical psychology. All programs begin on the last business day in August.

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II.  Application Process

A. Requirements for Application
Applicants must be enrolled in an APA-accredited Ph.D. or Psy.D. program in clinical psychology and have completed a minimum of 2 years of academic and practicum training in clinical psychology. Elevation to doctoral candidacy and completion of all academic requirements are necessary. Applicants to the Adult and Child/Adolescent tracks are expected to have had basic course work and practicum in psychodiagnostic assessment, including projective measures and psychotherapeutic interventions. Applicants to the Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy track need not have projective testing experience but familiarity with objective measures of personality and diagnosis is required.
 
B. Application and Interview Deadlines
All online APPIC applications transcripts, and letters of reference must be submitted by November 1. Interviews with the training director, current interns, and members of the training committee will be arranged by invitation after a review of all application materials is completed. Selected applicants will be contacted by December 15 to arrange an interview. Interviews will be arranged between the end of December and the end of January. Inquiries regarding your application can be made by calling (860) 545-7167.

Notification of acceptance will follow current APPIC guidelines.

The internship is participating in the match program.

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III.  Stipends

Internship stipends are $25,000 plus an employee-chosen health plan (for weekly premium), 12 vacation days, 3 floating holidays, 7 paid hospital holidays and 5 sick days.

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IV.  Submitting Application
 
Applicants need to download and complete the APPIC universal application.

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V.  The Psychology Department

The Psychology Department, within Hartford Hospital’s Department of Psychiatry, has its own leadership, with the Director of Psychology and Training reporting to the Medical Director. Psychology training is subsumed under one budget administered by the Director of Psychology. A full time Administrative Associate is available to the trainees and the Director. The Director of Psychology and Training has clinical, supervisory, and administrative responsibilities, and is integrated into training programs throughout the hospital but especially with teaching and supervisory training of Residents in the Department of Psychiatry’s Residency training programs. All psychologists hired in the Hartford Healthcare system report to the Director of Psychology for discipline-specific issues, professional education, licensing, continuing education as necessary, and credentialing. Psychologists in the Hartford Health Care system report clinically to the supervisors in their respective areas of emphasis.

The faculty of the Department of Psychology at the IOL consists of 25 FTEs and 8 part time doctoral level psychologists, six interns, and nine Residents. The department's theoretical perspective is integrative and eclectic with major emphases in psychodynamic psychology (ego psychology, self psychology, object relations and attachment psychology), cognitive behavioral psychology, systems theory (emphasizing group and family theory and practice and Bion, I/O communications dynamics), and behavioral psychology. We have a strong Group Psychotherapy training emphasis at the IOL. Members of the Psychology Department currently carry treatment responsibilities in the Child and Adolescent Division, Adult inpatient and Outpatient division, the General Psychiatry Service, Rehabilitation and Head Injury Service, and in Geriatric Services. Expertise in the areas of group psychotherapy, addictions, neuropsychological assessment, health psychology, psychological assessment, substance abuse treatment, head injury, trauma/abuse, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, brief therapy, pediatric consultation, and psychoanalytic psychology exists within the Psychology Department. Active research includes areas of neuropsychological correlates of schizophrenia and affective disorders, attention deficit disorder, traumatic brain injury, group psychotherapy, treatment of impaired and distressed professionals, borderline personality disorders (using DBT), the cognitive-behavioral treatment of anxiety disorders, health psychology and psychological assessment.

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VI.  The Internship in Clinical Psychology

A. Training Philosophy
The clinical psychology internship has been an integral part of The Institute of Living’s (IOL) training mission for over four decades. The IOL specializes in the evaluation and treatment of acute psychiatric and behavioral disorders, including acute exacerbations of chronic conditions. Stabilization of psychiatric crises using an integrated blend of brief psychotherapy, psychopharmacology, case management, and contact with community resources has become the hospital’s primary mission. The hospital has been very successful in establishing an umbrella of care for its patients, integrating the use of inpatient, partial hospital, intensive outpatient and outpatient services in response to a patient’s changing treatment needs.

The internship training program is structured such that the intern assumes treatment and assessment responsibilities within the IOL’s integrated healthcare delivery system. Interns assume responsibilities similar to those of a staff psychologist working within that same work site. Our faculty believes that today’s psychology training needs to be responsive to the changing context of health delivery systems throughout the country. Training occurs within a model that values the integration of the theoretical and empirical bases of assessment and intervention and includes exposure to and training in evidence-based methods. Seminars and supervision expose the intern to both psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral models of psychotherapy, crisis management, and case-management. Interns develop skills necessary for effective collaboration with the managed-care industry, and will learn to plan treatment in accordance with financial and temporal constraints.

In addition, the interns have the opportunity to work with several patients in need of both brief and longer-term outpatient care. Advanced training in individual and group psychotherapy provides the intern the opportunity to further develop their competencies in the treatment of a wide-variety of patient problems. The Psychology Department is committed to the ongoing professional development and education of its staff, and seeks to promote in the intern group a commitment to the pursuit of scholarly interests and post-graduate education.

B.  Orientation Period
During the first week of the internship, each trainee meets with each faculty member and various key administrative and clinical personnel in the healthcare system. Caseloads are kept to a minimum during this initial period so that interns can become familiar with the medical record and specific requirements existing in each unique training site.

The purpose of these meetings is to meet with key personnel and to integrate into the flow of the department and the healthcare system.

Please note:
The prevalence of drug use in today's society has received widespread recognition. In response to recent nationwide trends among both corporate businesses and hospital communities, the Institute has recognized the need to establish clear drug use policies for its employees. In light of this concern, the hospital has instituted a confidential drug testing procedure for all new employees that began on January 1, 1990. The hospital's Employee Assistance Program has requested that all departments notify prospective applicants of this procedure. Testing via urinalysis will occur prior to the internship start date with employment contingent upon the results. 

C. Training Goals
Goal #1: To develop interns’ competence in theories and methods of assessment and diagnosis in preparation for entry level positions as professional psychologists

Goal #2: Interns will demonstrate competence in theories and methods of case management and psychotherapeutic interventions appropriate to an entry level into the profession

Goal #3: Interns will appreciate the unique contributions of Psychology to the planning and delivery of services to a continuum of care and acquire skills necessary for treatment of individuals with severe emotional problems

Goal #4: To develop interns’ competence in scholarly inquiry and the application of evidence based knowledge to clinical practice

Goal #5: Interns will demonstrate competence in understanding individual differences and cultural/ethnic diversity as they impact clinical work

Goal #6: To acquire the necessary knowledge and values to function as an ethical psychologist in the practice of psychology

Goal #7: To increase interns’ knowledge of models of supervision and consultation

Goal #8: To relate effectively and meaningfully with individuals, groups, and other professionals

D.  Overview of the Child Psychology Internship
Three full-time internship slots are offered by the Clinical Psychology Department in this area. The training year has, as its core, six training experiences: (1) long-term child outpatient psychotherapy; (2) adolescent inpatient treatment; (3) child (ages 5-12) inpatient treatment; (4) psychodiagnostic evaluation rotations; (5) a four-month rotation at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center (CCMC - an affiliated hospital) in pediatric consultation/liaison, emergency department assessments, and inpatient stabilization; and (6) seminars.

The training year will consist of three four-month rotations: one on the child and adolescent inpatient service, one at CCMC’s pediatric service, and one focusing on psychological assessment.

The training objectives for the child/adolescent internship program are centered around the premise that a sound grounding in both behavioral and psychodynamically-informed developmental models of psychopathology and treatment will best prepare interns for successful careers working with the widest spectrum of patients. The continuum of care offered by the interns is designed to expose the intern to treatment settings in which competencies in individual, group, and family therapies can develop. In addition, exposure to emergency department functioning, consultation to a variety of medical-pediatric departments, and psychological testing will allow the intern to expand beyond the traditional psychiatric system and begin learning skills that will allow them to pursue careers interfacing with the medical establishment. Perhaps most importantly, the internship program, through its use of an apprenticeship/mentoring structure, provides each intern the contact with senior psychologists necessary for the development of a professional identity as a psychologist.
(1) Child Outpatient Psychotherapy
Each trainee will have 2-4 hours of direct service responsibilities during their four month outpatient rotation consisting of child psychotherapy cases and conjoint family therapy when indicated. This rotation occurs at the same time as the assessment rotation (see below). Interns can elect to use this time to treat patients presenting at the Anxiety Disorders Clinic, where standardized treatment protocols will be learned, students enrolled in our on-site therapeutic school (Grace Webb School) or may treat patients presenting at CCMC, using a variety of empirically-supported methodologies. Training in techniques of Play Therapy is also available. The interns participate in a wide variety of clinical programs and receive training in intake evaluation and diagnosis, treatment formulation, psychotherapy and liaison with school systems. Each intern receives up to two hours per week of psychotherapy supervision from the child psychology staff. From this pool of patients, one to two year-long therapy cases will be carried during the other rotations. These case assignments often involve active collaboration with other providers and community agencies.
 
(2 & 3)  Child and Adolescent Inpatient Psychotherapy
The Child and Adolescent Inpatient Service consists of a 14 bed adolescent unit and a 12 bed child unit, and is staffed by psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, nurses, occupational therapists, and psychiatric technicians. The units provide a range of services, including short-term managed care treatment approaches to longer-term services for severely disturbed patients in need of hospitalization, many of whom have gone through unsuccessful outpatient and short-term inpatient treatments. A broad spectrum of acute and chronic psychotic, developmentally disabled, personality disordered, addicted, conduct disordered, and affectively disordered patients is represented. Each intern functions as primary therapist for up to two patients in the service. Interns gain experience not only as primary therapists and case managers, but also in functioning as a psychologist in a multi-disciplinary team. Three hours of supervision are provided to each intern per week. Interns will also conduct social-skills groups on the Children’s unit, process-oriented group therapies while on the adolescent service, and family therapy when indicated in the treatment of their adolescents. This rotation provides an immersion into the role of an inpatient psychologist.

Training objectives include a thorough learning of DSM-IV diagnoses, development of advanced focal and intensive psychotherapeutic interventions, developing group therapy skills with acute patients, and exposure to collaborative, brief family interventions. Each intern will complete a four month rotation on this service. Caseload will be an average of two patients plus two hours of group therapy.
 
(4)  Psychodiagnostic Evaluations
Each intern will perform evaluations throughout their 12 months at the IOL, consisting of cognitive and personality assessment for children and adolescents. Moreover, each intern will spend four months being the primary tester in the assessment service, providing assessments for child and adolescent inpatients and outpatients. In addition, the intern will test students attending our on-site therapeutic school (Grace Webb School) for purposes of diagnostic and educational planning. Interns may also pursue as a minor elective exposure to neuropsychological assessment. Testing responsibilities will consist of 1 to 2 batteries per week while on this rotation and one per month while on the inpatient service and CCMC rotations. Interns gain experience in test administration, scoring, interpretation, report writing and in communicating test findings to other therapists. In addition, during this intensive assessment rotation each intern will have up to 10 hours per week to pursue elective interests during this rotation.

Consistent with our training mission, interns will be required to integrate relevant psychodynamic models of interpretation with objective and cognitive data, and further develop their ability to communicate test findings in written and oral form. The testing service plays a vital role in the mission of the IOL and we expect interns to develop comfort and expertise in this consultant role. Child interns test predominantly child and adolescent inpatients, but may on occasion be asked to test adult patients. Interns will be expected to complete a minimum of 24 assessments during the training year.
 
(5)  Pediatric Consultation Service
Each intern will spend four months providing consultation and brief therapy intervention to pediatric patients hospitalized at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center (CCMC – formerly known as Newington Children’s Hospital). CCMC is one of three hospitals in the state of Connecticut that provides comprehensive medical services to children, and along with Hartford Hospital and The Institute of Living, has a long tradition of training psychologists.

This rotation is designed to introduce interns to the role of clinical psychology in a primary-care setting and will prepare interns to work within a medical model health system. The interns’ primary responsibilities involve the provision of psychiatric consultation services to the medical departments throughout the hospital. Consultation to oncology, cardiology, rehabilitation, pulmonary, pain and other departments are usual. The intern will also provide both short-term, as well as, long-term individual and family therapy to patients in need of adjunctive care. Interns will be trained in a variety of empirically-based treatments that utilize cognitive-behavioral methodologies. Each intern will be placed for four hours weekly in the Emergency Department of CCMC conducting emergency assessments and helping to determine needs for services.
 
(6)  Seminar Program
Trainees attend a variety of seminars, offered by both the Psychology Department and the psychiatry residency training program. We anticipate that the following seminars will be available this year:

  • Clinical Inference & Professional Ethics (Required)
  • Modern Readings in Personality and Psychotherapy (Required)
  • Family and Group Therapies
  • Weekly Grand Rounds (Required)
  • Child Psychotherapy Seminar and Case Conference (Required)
  • CT Children's Medical Center Grand Rounds
  • Psychosis Seminar
  • Focal Therapy and Case Conference (Required)
E.  Overview of the Adult Internship Program
Three full-time positions are offered by the Clinical Psychology Department. The training year is composed of three primary four-month rotations. The primary training objective is to assist the intern in acquiring the necessary skill base to achieve a high level of competence in the evaluation, assessment, and treatment of acute psychiatric illness, including acute exacerbations of chronic mental illness. The Psychology Department believes that intensive training experience within an acute inpatient and intensive outpatient hospital service provides exposure to the broadest range of psychiatric disorders and aids in the development of confidence in the interns’ diagnostic and treatment skills. An integrative treatment orientation that is directed by a deepening appreciation of early developmental and object-relational experiences will be provided. Interns will be expected to integrate the use of cognitive-behavioral interventions, skills-training methodologies (e.g. Dialectical Behavior Therapy), and psychodynamically-informed treatment planning. The training faculty wants to assist the intern in deepening their ability to conceptualize on multiple levels and recognizing the interactions between intrapersonal, interpersonal, and systemic forces influencing the patients with whom they work. The adult track will prepare interns to function within a hospital setting and also to treat patients presenting with moderate to severe forms of psychopathology.
(1)  Adult Inpatient Treatment
Each intern will be assigned to the general adult service that admits higher functioning patients aged 18 and older for treatment of acute symptoms. This training site will prepare interns to succeed within a managed care environment and strengthen their brief therapy skills. Each will serve as primary therapist for up to three patients and provide conjunctive family/marital therapy when indicated. Many of these patients will be referred for admission from one of our partial hospitalization and intensive outpatient programs. The unit is milieu-based and provides short-term therapies for severely disturbed patients in need of hospitalization, many of whom have gone through unsuccessful outpatient and short-term inpatient treatments.

A broad spectrum of acute and high-functioning psychotic, personality-disordered, addicted, conduct-disordered, and affectively-disordered patients is represented. Interns gain experience not only as primary therapists and case managers, but also in functioning as psychologists in a multi-disciplinary team while learning methods of milieu therapy. Each intern will gradually assume greater responsibility for conducting the unit's daily intensive psychotherapy group. Along with the unit psychologist and postdoctoral resident, the intern will also provide consultation to the other treatment teams. A minimum of two hours of supervision per week will be provided to each intern.

Competencies in rapid assessment of mental status, case formulation, diagnosis, and focal individual and group psychotherapy will be developed. In-depth exposure to psychopharmacological and other biological interventions (e.g., ECT) and close collaboration with psychiatrists, social workers, nurses, and physicians will prepare interns to assume careers in a hospital-based setting and settings servicing the broadest range of patient populations.
 
(2)  Intensive Outpatient Programs
Each adult intern spends four months providing group psychotherapies and case management to adult patients admitted to our Professionals’ Program. This is an intensive outpatient program for patients recently discharged from the inpatient service or referred from community providers who are in need of intensive services to prevent hospitalization and restore occupational and psychosocial functioning. Patients are generally higher functioning and are in the process of returning to work or school. The intern will function as a staff treatment manager, providing case management services to at least two ongoing patients, and provide up to eight hours of group psychotherapy. This is a three-day per week program that includes traditional process group therapies and a variety of skill based therapies, including Dialectical Behavior Therapy and a variety of cognitive behavioral methods. The goal of the rotation is help interns gain experience in providing psycho-educational, insight-oriented, and skill-based approaches to group treatment and to learn the principles of managing high acuity patients in a less restrictive treatment environment.

During this rotation, interns will have the opportunity to pursue elective interests, will continue to perform two psychological assessments per month, and will continue to carry a small caseload of outpatients.
 
(3)  Individual Outpatient Psychotherapy
Interns will have the opportunity to provide psychotherapy to a variety of patient populations. The available training sites include the following:
  • Adult Outpatient Clinic
    Interns will have the opportunity to provide long-term psychotherapy to patients admitted to the clinic from either the community or referred from our acute inpatient service. In addition to individual psychotherapy, an intern may elect to gain experience with providing couple’s therapy. Training focusing on the use of psychodynamically and personality-informed models of treatment is available.
  • Hartford Hospital’s Behavioral Health Service
    Integrated within the Health Psychology Division of the Psychology Department, this service provides both short and long-term treatment of patients presenting with co-morbid medical and psychological problems. Interns also can acquire skills in the evaluation of patients presenting to the Pain, Bariatric, Transplant, and Epilepsy services.
  • Anxiety Disorders Center
    Interns can elect to carry individual and/or group psychotherapy patients presenting with a variety of anxiety disorders. Training in the use of manualized treatment protocols utilizing an exposure-based and response prevention model is emphasized.
  • Schizophrenia Rehabilitation Program and Potentials Clinic
    These programs focus on the diagnosis, early intervention, and treatment of patients presenting with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. The Schizophrenia rehabilitation Program is a multi-dimensional treatment program for the more persistently ill patient that includes attentional retraining using computer technology, group therapy, motivational training, and individual psychotherapy. The Potentials Clinic provides early detection and intervention for young adult patients recently diagnosed, including individual, group, and family psychotherapies as well as pharmacotherapy.
Interns will be expected to carry at least two outpatients throughout their twelve months of internship.

(4)  Psychological Assessment
Each intern will spend four months primarily performing psychological assessments of adolescent and adult inpatients and outpatients. This rotation will focus on the use of cognitive, intellectual, objective and projective tests, and neuropsychological screens to assess adolescent and adult mental functioning. Advanced thematic and Rorschach interpretation and report writing skills will be emphasized. Two hours of supervision per battery will be provided and the intern will be responsible for up to two assessments per week. Referrals will come from our centralized testing service that responds to diagnostic and risk assessment requests from all areas of the hospital.

Interns will be expected to develop competencies in the administration, interpretation, and communication of test findings both verbally and in written form within a short time frame, and will gain valuable experience functioning as a consultant to the treatment team or referring clinician. During this rotation interns will have the opportunity to pursue additional outpatient and group therapy training. Interests in neuropsychological testing and forensic assessments can be pursued. Interns can expect to have completed approximately 24-28 assessments by the end of the training year.

(5) Elective Rotations
In addition to the core rotations, interns participate in elective training experiences during the year, with the majority of time occurring during the four-month psychological assessment rotation. Opportunities include:
  • Adult Interns
    • Health Psychology: Providing both psychodynmaically-informed and CBT based outpatient psychotherapy to patients presenting to the behavioral health service
    • Eating Disorders: Providing group psychotherapy to patients being treated in this intensive outpatient program.
    • Schizophrenia Rehabilitation Program and Potential’s Clinic: Providing individual psychotherapy or group psychotherapy to patients diagnosed with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.
    • Anxiety Disorders Clinic: Providing group or individual outpatient psychotherapy using manualized treatment protocols.
    • Neuropsychological Assessment: Depending on prior level of preparation, involvement with the Clinical Neuropsychology Service providing neuropsychological assessment.
  • Child Interns
    • Adult Outpatient Psychotherapy
    • School-based group psychotherapy
    • Anxiety Disorders Clinic: Providing group or individual outpatient psychotherapy using manualized treatment protocols.
    • Neuropsychological Assessment: Depending on prior level of preparation, involvement with the Clinical Neuropsychology Service providing neuropsychological assessment.
(6)  Seminar Program
Trainees attend a variety of seminars, offered by both the Psychology Department and the psychiatry residency training program. We anticipate the following seminars will be available this year:
  • Family and Group Therapy
  • Clinical Inference & Professional Ethics (Required)
  • Modern Readings in Personality and Psychotherapy (Required)
  • Weekly Grand Rounds (Required)
  • Psychopharmacology
  • Psychosis Seminar
  • Focal Therapy and Case Conference Seminar (Required)
In addition to the required seminars, all interns will attend the department's weekly staff meeting where both administrative and educational issues are addressed. Besides involving the interns in the full workings of the department and providing an inside view of the hospital-based practice of clinical psychology, a wide range of educational topics is discussed. In accordance with APA guidelines, each intern will be expected to present to the faculty case material involving either a psychotherapy case or psychodiagnostic evaluation, research findings, or topic of their choice during the year.

F. Overview of Cognitive Behavior Therapy Track
Beginning in the 2013-2014 training year, we will offer a CBT internship track. The overarching aim of this track (as with the IOL internship as a whole) is the practical integration of psychological science and practice. Within this general framework, the CBT track will emphasize the use of critical thinking skills, the application of basic and applied research to complex cases, and the thoughtful and systematic evaluation of clinical work using evidence-based practices.

One full-time position will be offered by the Clinical Psychology Department. The training year is composed of three primary four-month rotations. The primary training objective is to assist the intern in acquiring the necessary skill base to achieve a high level of competence in the evaluation, assessment, and treatment of acute and chronic psychiatric illness, including acute exacerbations of chronic mental illness. The Psychology Department believes that intensive training experience within an acute inpatient and outpatient hospital service provides exposure to the broadest range of psychiatric disorders and aids in the development of confidence in the interns’ diagnostic and treatment skills. Interns will be expected to integrate the use of cognitive-behavioral interventions, skills-training methodologies (e.g. Dialectical Behavior Therapy), and become familiar with psychodynamically-informed treatment planning when appropriate. The training faculty wants to assist the intern in deepening their ability to conceptualize on multiple levels and recognizing the interactions between intrapersonal, interpersonal, and systemic forces influencing the patients with whom they work. This track will include the following training experiences and objectives:
  • To prepare psychologists who can consume new research findings and integrate them into practice. Using individual and group mentorship programs, interns will read, discuss, and evaluate practice-relevant research articles; develop treatment plans that consider the best available empirical evidence; and discuss the therapeutic, ethical, and legal aspects of evidence-based practice.
  • Interns will participate in research projects using evidence-based strategies of measurement and analysis in order to evaluate the efficacy of their treatments, to develop and refine programs, and to inform best practices for the institution.
  • To prepare psychologists who can produce new scientific findings that will contribute to the literature. All interns will have the opportunity to participate in the broad range of basic and applied research conducted at the Institute of Living, including psychotherapy research, pharmacotherapy clinical trials, neuroimaging research, and more.
The CBT track intern will spend at least 10 hours per week providing outpatient services at the Anxiety Disorders Center/Center for CBT for the entire internship year. This will allow them to treat patients over a longer period of time, become involved in longer-term projects at the ADC/CCBT, and provide a "home base" that will include meeting with a primary internship preceptor.

The CBT track intern will complete 3 rotations, each lasting 4 months. At least 1 inpatient rotation will be required. Rotations offered will include:

  • Young Adult Services
  • Adolescent Inpatient Services
  • Health Psychology
  • Schizophrenia Rehabilitation Program
  • Adult Inpatient Services

In addition, the CBT track intern will complete 4 electives, each lasting 3 months (although an elective could be extended to two periods by mutual agreement). Electives offered will include:

  • Young Adult Services
  • Adolescent Inpatient Services
  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy Program
  • Neuropsychology
  • Health Psychology
  • Schizophrenia Rehabilitation Program
  • Anxiety Disorders Center/Center for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
  • Research (collaboration with faculty)
As is the case with the IOL internship as a whole, the CBT track intern will attend psychotherapy and professional development seminars and the department's weekly staff meeting. In accordance with APA guidelines, each intern will be expected to present to the faculty case material involving either a psychotherapy case or psychodiagnostic evaluation, research findings, or topic of their choice during the year.

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VII.  Evaluation of Trainees and the Training Program


Continuing evaluation of supervisors and trainees is carried out throughout the year. Training occurs within an apprentice/mentor model where open discussions between supervisors and trainees are fostered. Written evaluations of trainees are discussed with the trainee at the end of each rotation. Direct observation of intern performance is used via recorded sessions or by joint interviews with the supervisor. The supervisor evaluates progression of the intern’s adherence to treatment and competency. Interns complete end-of-year evaluations of all aspects of their internship experience.

Specific skills and competencies are expected to develop over the year and are evaluated by the supervisor.

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VIII.  Who Should Apply


Intern applicants who have an interest and background in psychological assessment and psychotherapy and who have interests in advancing competencies in providing hospital-based services to patients experiencing both acute psychiatric difficulties and chronic mental health issues should apply. Traditional psychological assessment using objective and projective measures is emphasized in the Child/adolescent and Adult tracks, and trainees interested in advancing their skills using these instruments should consider applying. A basic competency in administration, scoring and interpreting of these measures is required. Applicants interested in the CBT track should have had an interest and background in CBT models of intervention and have basic competency in the use of objective measures of personality and diagnosis. Preference is given to applicants from APA-accredited doctoral programs in clinical psychology, although applicants from other programs will be considered. All applicants should have completed a minimum of two years of practicum experience providing direct patient. Prior to beginning the internship, it is considered advantageous for applicants to have completed data collection on their dissertation.

Psychologists who have completed APA-accredited internships and who desire further intensive training to acquire advanced competency in clinical psychology are invited to apply to our Residency program.

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IX.  Internship Selection Procedure


An applicant’s completed application will be reviewed by at least two members of the psychology staff who are participating in the internship selection.

During the initial review an applicant may be excluded from further consideration for the following reasons:
  • Applicant is not enrolled in an APA-accredited doctoral psychology program
  • Applicant has not completed at least two practicum experiences
  • Applicant has accrued fewer than 500 hours of clinical practice
  • Applicant has not completed all the graduate courses required for completion of their doctoral program
  • Applicant has no experience providing comprehensive psychological testing using intellectual, projective and/or objective measures.
  • Applicant has neither completed a graduate course in initial interviewing or DSM-IV nor had supervised experience in conducting an initial intake interview and providing individual psychotherapy.
Live interviews are required for selected applicants. For applicants who are scheduled for interviews, each applicant will be interviewed by the Training Director, a current intern, and at least two other supervisory staff. In addition, the group of applicants being interviewed on a given day will meet with the current group of interns during an informal lunch that is meant to provide another informational meeting. Each interviewer completes a rating form after the interview which is used to help construct the final ranking list for the match.

Statement of Nondiscrimination
The Institute of Living/Hartford Hospital is an equal opportunity employer. We welcome applicants from various racial, ethnic, sexual orientation, religious and cultural backgrounds as well as those with physical disabilities.

Housing
Housing is provided by the intern.

Accreditation Status
The psychology internship is accredited by the Committee on Accreditation of the American Psychological Association

For information pertaining to APA accreditation, please contact:
American Psychological Association
Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation
750 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
(T) 202-336-5979 (F) 202-336-5978
Email: apaaccred@apa.org
Web: www.apa.org/ed/accreditation

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X.  Current Psychology Department Training Staff


Patricia Adams, Ph.D.
St. John's University
Individual, group and family psychotherapy of children and adolescents.  School-based interventions.

Kimberly A. Barton, Ph.D.
Clinical Child Psychologist
University of North Texas
Child, adolescent, and adult psychotherapy; Pediatric psychology-treatment of those with co-morbid physical and emotional disorders; Psychological assessment.

Allen L. Carter, Ph.D.
Staff Psychologist
University of Georgia

Child psychotherapy, family therapy, psychotherapy with developmentally impaired children. Learning disability assessment. Clinical information systems-computer applications. Developmental lines in developmentally impaired children. Adolescent drug and alcohol abuse treatment.

Cristina Ciocca, Psy.D. (adjunct)
University of Miami
Neuropsychological and psychological assessments of adolescents through geriatrics with specific interest in cross-cultural issues in assessment. Research in attention training of schizophrenic patients.

Elizabeth Davis

James DeGiovanni, Ph.D.
Director, Psychology Department
Director of Training
Temple University

Psychodynamic psychotherapy, group psychotherapy of severe personality disorders; object relation approaches to marital and family therapy. Efficacy of long-term group therapy in treatment of resistant and character-disordered patients. Brief treatment of depression and anxiety. Ericksonian and hypnotherapeutic models of psychotherapy.

Mara De Maio, Ph.D.
Program Manager, Adult Partial Hospital Program

St. John’s University
Treatment of patients with severe and prolonged mental illness, eating disorders, dually-diagnosed patients; Group psychotherapy;. Effects of gender-role socialization on behavior. Clinical and research interests include psychotic disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, trauma, and cognitive remediation.  

Gretchen Diefenbach, Ph.D.
Psychologist
Louisiana State University

Behavioral and cognitive-behavioral therapies for anxiety disorders; research interests include the psychopathology, assessment, and treatment of anxiety and related disorders, in particular generalized anxiety disorder, trichotillomania, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Ellen Dornelas, Ph.D.
Director of Behavioral Health Programs, Preventive Cardiology
Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology and Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Health psychology. Individual and group therapy for smoking cessation, stress management and psychological adjustment to medical illness. Research in areas of smoking cessation, weight reduction and exercise adherence.

Rachel M. Duzant, Psy.D.
Clinical Psychologist, Treatment Manager

Chicago School of Professional Psychology

Dr. Duzant is a licensed clinical psychologist and a treatment manager at the Schizophrenia Rehabilitation Program for the young adult track.  Her clinical interests include cultural diversity issues, psychological assessment, and advocacy for patients.  Dr. Duzant is registered as a National Health Service Provider.

Jennifer Ferrand, Psy.D.
Staff Psychologist

University of Hartford

Psychological assessment of adults, with a focus on health psychology. Individual psychotherapy with medical patients, clinical hypnosis, behavior change, coping with pain.

Mary Foster, Ph.D.
Staff Neuropsychologist

University of Cincinatti

Dr. Foster conducts both inpatient and outpatient neuropsychological assessments of adults and older adults with a wide range of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Her particular interests include dementia, mild cognitive impairment, and cerebrovascular disease.

Christina Gilliam, Ph.D.
Psychologist Anxiety Disorders Center

University of Missouri-St. Louis

Dr. Gilliam’s research interests include the role of cognitive processes in the development, maintenance, and treatment of anxiety disorders and examining the efficacy of novel cognitive-behavioral treatments for anxiety disorders.  Currently, Dr. Gilliam is the co-investigator for two treatment studies, “Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy for Combat-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom Veterans” and “D-Cycloserine-Augmented CBT for Prior Treatment Nonresponders with OCD.” Dr. Gilliam specializes in the cognitive-behavioral treatment of anxiety and related disorders.

Jessica Guite

Lawrence Haber, Ph.D.
Director, Ambulatory and Young Adult Services

University of Tennessee

Severe mental illness, caregiver issues, community acceptance and integration for the mentally ill, as well as staff and family education, community and program confutations in the area of psychosis.

Scott Hannan, Ph.D.
Staff Psychologist, Anxiety Disorders Center

Fordham University

Dr. Hannan treats children, adolescents, and adults. His clinical interests include obsessive-compulsive disorder, phobias, panic disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder related to motor vehicle accidents, and the treatment of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders. In addition to seeing patients in individual treatment, Dr. Hannan runs groups for children and adolescents. Groups are for children and adolescents diagnosed with Panic Disorder, Social Phobia, Separation Anxiety Disorder, Specific Phobia and/or Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Dr. Hannan is also interested in the use of psychological measurements to assess treatment progress. He is currently working on adding computer administered measures to clinical treatment as a way to monitor treatment progress and aid treatment decisions.

Danielle Koby, Ph.D.
Clinical Health Psychologist

University of Connecticut
Dr. Koby provides outpatient evaluation and treatment (individual, group) of psychological concerns among patients with persistent physical symptoms. As a member of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center she also specializes in cognitive-behavioral therapy for patients with epilepsy and non-epileptic spells, as well as movement disorders and other neurological symptoms. Her research involves expanding knowledge and treatment of complex physical symptom disorders.

Richard Lautenbach, Ph.D.
Staff Psychologist
Coordinator of Group Therapy Services

Kent State University

Treatment of patients with severe and  prolonged mental illness, eating disorders, dually-diagnosed patients; Group psychotherapy; Effects of gender-role socialization on behavior.

Dr. Ralph Dodd
Coordinator, Grace S. Webb School

University of Hartford
Child and adolescent assessment and psychotherapy. Individual, group, and family psychotherapy of adult patients presenting with acute psychiatric disorders. 

David W. Lovejoy, Psy.D.    
Staff Neuropsychologist
The Virginia Consortium for Clinical Psychology (College of William & Mary, Eastern Virginia Medical School, & Old Dominion University)
Neuropsychological assignment and treatment of Adult ADHD, traumatic brain injury, and stroke. Brief treatment of post-injury adjustment disorder.

Matt Malouf

Elizabeth Moore
Staff Psychologist, Anxiety Disorders Center
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Dr. Moore’s clinical and research interests include cognitive-behavioral treatment for anxiety disorders and the role of cognitive processes in the development, maintenance, and treatment of anxiety disorders. Dr. Moore has particular expertise treating social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and panic disorder. She has published numerous research articles on the treatment and nature of anxiety disorders and has spoken on these topics at national and local conferences.

Kevin O'Shea, Psy.D.
Clinical Psychologist, Inpatient Treatment Manager - Donnelly 2 South

American School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University, Washington, DC
Integration of psychodynamic, behavioral, and cognitive-behavioral techniques and perspectives in time-limited individual, group, and family therapy for depression, anxiety disorders, and character pathology. Late adolescent, adult, and older adult populations. Special interest in the treatment of substance use disorders and dementia.

Howard Oakes, Psy.D., ABPP/ABCN
Associate Director, Head Injury Program

University of Hartford

Neuropsychological and psychological assessment; traumatic brain injury; rehabilitation and consultation.

Barbara Rzepski, Ph.D.
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Co-morbid physical and emotional disorders in children and adolescents. Consultation-liaison services to primary medical care. Cognitive behavioral approaches to treatment.  Rehabilitation of children with traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. Pediatric psychology.

Melissa Santos, Ph.D.
Pediatric Psychologist, CCMC

Texas Tech University
Dr. Santos is a pediatric psychologist at Connecticut Children's Medical Center (CCMC) conducting individual, group and family based treatment of pediatric obesity. She also provides the psychological assessment of adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery. Her research is in the treatment of pediatric obesity and factors influencing weight maintenance. 

Laura M. I. Saunders, Psy.D.
Child Psychologist
University of Hartford
Child, adolescent, and family psychotherapy; behavioral management strategies; clinical interests in children with attentional, hyperactive, impulsive, and disruptive behaviors; research in gay/lesbian youth issues.

Elisabeth Scherpenisse, Ph.D.
Clinical Psychologist, Grace S. Webb School
University of Tennessee
Psychological assessment, particularly projective techniques; personality disorders; psychotherapy with children and adolescents; group psychotherapy in a school setting; identity development in adolescence; mechanisms of change in psychotherapy.

Jane Schilling, Psy.D.
Treatment Manager -Adult Inpatient Psychiatry Service

Alliant International University, San Francisco
Clinical interests include inpatient treatment focused on the application of brief psychodynamic and cognitive behavioral theories, psychosocial rehabilitation, and delivering effective, timely treatment services in an era of managed care. Research interests have included biological/neurological bases of behavior particularly among children with learning disabilities and culture relevant therapy. 

Meredith P. Schwartzman, Ph.D.
Clinical Psychologist, Treatment Manager-Child and Adolescent Day Program

University of Tennessee
She specifically is providing individual, group, and family therapy to older adolescents involved in the Day Program. Her clinical interests include outpatient treatment for children, adolescents and their families, the treatment of psychological issues among chronically ill youth, eating disorders, and the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders. 

Dana Shagan, Psy.D.
Coordinator of Diversity Issues and Cultural Competence for the Psychology Department
Clinical Psychologist, Schizophrenia Rehabilitation Program
University of Hartford
Chronic mental illness, assessment, groups; adult and geriatric population.

Jessica Sierra, Ph.D.
Clinical Psychologist-Division of Health Psychology

University of Connecticut
Psychological assessment of adults, with a focus on bariatric surgery and transplant candidates. Provide individual therapy for medical patients. 

Sarah Tartar, Ph.D.
Staff Clinical Neuropsychologist

University of Connecticut
She has presented and published in the areas of dementia, head injury, ethics, and the neuropsychological underpinnings of anxiety disorders. Dr. Tartar has particular interests in geriatric neuropsychology, mild traumatic brain injury, as well as other neurological disorders. 

Warren Thime, Ph.D.
Program Manager, Schizophrenia Rehabilitation Program
Fordham University
Severe mental illness; group, family and individual psychotherapy, assessment.

Mona Tiernan, Psy.D.
Health Psychologist

The Virginia Consortium for Professional Psychology
Psychological assessment of adults, with particular focus on organ transplant and pain management.

David Tolin, Ph.D.
Director, Anxiety Disorders Center
University of Arkansas
Behavioral and cognitive-behavioral therapies for anxiety disorders, particularly OCD and PTSD; treatment outcome research; experimental psychopathology; cognitive models of anxiety; clinical psychopharmacology.

Kevin Tsang, Psy.D.
Staff Psychologist-CCMC

Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology
Pediatric psychology; consultation-liaison services to primary medical care; cognitive-behavioral approaches to treatment; behavioral management strategies; treatment of children and families receiving hematologic/oncologic care including issues of coping and pain management. 

Blaise Worden, Ph.D.
Staff Psychologist
Rutgers University
Dr. Worden received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Rutgers University. In 2009 she completed her predoctoral internship at the Greater Hartford Internship Consortium in Hartford, CT. In 2012 she completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship at the Anxiety Disorders Center and has remained on staff as a licensed psychologist. Her clinical and research interests include treatment outcome assessment and mechanisms of change underlying empirically-supported psychological treatments. Dr. Worden is also involved in several research projects at the Anxiety Disorders Center, including studies on the treatment of hoarding disorder and co-occurring anxiety and substance use disorders. Dr. Worden specializes in the treatment of anxiety and related disorders. She has particular experience with cognitive-behavioral treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder, hoarding disorder, and substance dependence.

Kevin P. Young, Ph.D.
Staff Psychologist
Fairleigh Dickinson University
Dr. Young is a lifespan clinical neuropsychologist who is involved with training students, residents and fellows. His interests include the validity and incremental utility of assessment in clinical settings; risk assessment, personality assessment, and integration of multiple types of data (i.e., cognitive, performance, “objective”, and “projective”); prescription and psychosocial treatment trends/decision making; as well as dementia, concussion/mTBI, and effort testing.

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