Linda Segal Blinn
"It would definitely be a benefit to eliminate a drug that isn't going to be as effective. Why put yourself through that and additional side effects if it's not going to be something that's going to work for that particular patient?"

Linda Segal Blinn, a breast cancer survivor who was treated at the Helen & Harry Gray Cancer Center in 2001 and 2002, said that the promise of Total Cancer Care, Hartford Hospital's collaboration with the Moffitt Cancer Center is that the emerging genetic science may make it possible to pinpoint specific treatments that are best suited to an individual and his or her cancer.
 
When tissue is removed for diagnosis and/or treatment from Hartford Hospital patients who choose to participate in this exciting research study, a small amount of that tissue will be sent for molecular and genetic analysis at Moffitt. The primary purpose is to study a large number of patients with particular cancers to help understand potential targets for the development of future therapies. Over time, individual patients also may benefit from this genetic "fingerprinting."
 
"It would definitely be a benefit to eliminate a drug that isn't going to be as effective," said Blinn. "Why put yourself through that and additional side effects if it's not going to be something that's going to work for that particular patient?"
 
Blinn, a Glastonbury resident who works as a legal specialist for ING, said that chemotherapy was more difficult for her than either surgery or radiation therapy. The work with Moffitt, she said, could help bring about an era in which tissue samples help to specifically target therapies for patients.
 
 "I think it's great," she said.